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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Betty-Ann Blaine's Anti-Gay Remarks Sparked Outrage: "The Nasty Act of Homosexuals Spread AIDS"


In light of the recent Supreme Court challenge (Javed Jaghai vs Attorney General) to repeal Jamaica's Buggery Law, Betty-Ann Blaine one of Jamaica's leading Anti-Gay Activists, homophobic remarks/attack has sparked outrage within the gay community.

On July 14-15, 2012, Betty-Ann Blaine the founder of Hear the Children Cry (Children advocacy group) contacted Dwayne Brown (Advocate) via Facebook message to voice her disapproval of the homosexual lifestyle and the court challenge of the buggery law.

According to Betty-Ann Blaine "gays kill more gays in Jamaica than straight, fact. I am against the repeal of the buggery law because of the effect that it can have on the needy." During an heated exchange with Mr. Brown, she wrote, "just know that the rights you are fighting for will not go anywhere because of me in particular  Just watch out for aids while you practice your nasty deprave acts."



The sentiments shared by Betty-Ann Blaine, Lawyer's Christian Fellowship Jamaica and the Jamaican Church that, "homosexual practice is nasty, depraved and responsible for the spread of HIV/AIDS in Jamaica," foster the proliferation of gross intolerance and homophobic violence towards gays and lesbians living in Jamaica.

Section 76, 77 & 79 of the Offences Against the Person Act violate the constitutional  rights of gay men by criminalizing consensual intimacy between gay men in private and erodes their right to equality before the law. Ten (10) years imprisonment and hard labor for consensual intimacy between gay men is constitutional and inhumane. Thieves, murders, fornicators, adulterers, pedophiles and among other criminals in most cases do not face such penalties or serve any prison/jail time.

Blaine's suggestion that "the nasty act of homosexuals spread AIDS," is reprehensible, derogatory, discriminatory, homophobic and disgraceful. This kind of attack should not be tolerated and encouraged by public officials in Jamaica.










Online-Exhibit 
Evidence (Betty-Ann Blaine' Facebook Conversation with Dwayne Brown)







27 comments:

  1. Given the proven relationship between outlawing homosexual sex and increased HIV infection rates, this woman is not only wrong, but dangerous and heartless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  2. Menopause i swear

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Damn it thats what menopause sounds like...its scary !

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    3. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  3. Betty-Ann Blaine should be ashamed of herself.She allows her prejudice towards homosexuals to get the best of her. Using the children to mask her bigotry is sad.

    I lost all respect for her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  4. She is a bit off as far as headwork is concerned but guess what, a lot of people are unaware that anal sex is a more "efficient" way to spread HIV than vaginal sex, so she was not entirely off on that one. So, because you prancing fairies like to take it and give it up the but but in doing so use a condom, does not mean she is wrong in her comments.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  5. Heterosexuals are disproportionately and highly infected with HIV/AIDS than homosexuals in Jamaica and around the world. I guess Vaginal sex does not prevent HIV. Heterosexuals also practice anal sex. Anal sex is not Gay sex, it's a sexual activity.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  6. A words to the wise is sufficient- its even not necessary....it's the STUPID ones that need plenty advice and council!

    ReplyDelete
  7. One way can ensure that there will be another generation of people. Another way is always fruitless and is far more likely to result in death from disease. What path is the logical one to encourage?

    ReplyDelete
  8. This idiot of a woman has been a failure in life and has a bitter spirit. She tried launching a political party in Jamaica and failed miserably. Why she cares so much about people's bedroom behavior is unknown to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
    2. In the study, Goodreau and a colleague, Dr. Matthew R. Golden, analyzed data from two large population-based surveys. Using those figures, they estimated how many sex partners gay men and straight men and women have, and what number of gay men have either insertive or receptive anal sex, or both.
      The report is published in the Sept. 12 online edition of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
      "We found that even if gay men behave the same way heterosexuals do -- in terms of sexual partner numbers -- gay men would still have a huge HIV epidemic," Goodreau said.
      Conversely, "even if heterosexual men behaved the way gay men do, they would not have a huge HIV epidemic," he added.
      In fact, for straight men and women to experience an epidemic of HIV infection as widespread as that of gay men, they would have to have an average of almost five unprotected sexual partners every year -- almost three times the rate of the average gay male, Goodreau and Golden found.
      So, why the higher HIV risk for gay men? "A couple of different things could give gay men an overall higher risk for HIV than heterosexuals," Goodreau said.
      One reason HIV remains epidemic among gay men is that anal sex is much more conducive to the transmission of HIV transmission than is vaginal sex, the researcher said.
      "That puts gay men at much higher risk overall," he said.
      In addition, HIV transmission is more easily transmitted through the penis than via the vagina or the anus, Goodreau said. Heterosexuals tend to maintain the same role (insertive vs. receptive), while gay men can switch roles -- making the transmission of HIV more likely, he noted.
      So, for gay men and straight men who have the same number of partners and have unprotected sex, gay men are more likely to transmit and receive HIV, Goodreau said. "That's why you can get huge epidemics among gay men and virtually none among heterosexual men," he said.

      Delete
  9. • The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer.

    The anus was designed to hold in feces. The anus is surrounded with a ring-like muscle, called the anal sphincter, which tightens after we defecate. When the muscle is tight, anal penetration can be painful and difficult. Repetitive anal sex may lead to weakening of the anal sphincter, making it difficult to hold in feces until you can get to the toilet.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer.

    The anus was designed to hold in feces. The anus is surrounded with a ring-like muscle, called the anal sphincter, which tightens after we defecate. When the muscle is tight, anal penetration can be painful and difficult. Repetitive anal sex may lead to weakening of the anal sphincter, making it difficult to hold in feces until you can get to the toilet.

    ReplyDelete
  11. The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer.

    The anus was designed to hold in feces. The anus is surrounded with a ring-like muscle, called the anal sphincter, which tightens after we defecate. When the muscle is tight, anal penetration can be painful and difficult. Repetitive anal sex may lead to weakening of the anal sphincter, making it difficult to hold in feces until you can get to the toilet.

    ReplyDelete
  12. • The anus lacks the natural lubrication the vagina has. Penetration can tear the tissue inside the anus, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter the bloodstream. This can result in the spread of sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Studies have suggested that anal exposure to HIV poses 30 times more risk for the receptive partner than vaginal exposure. Exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) may also lead to the development of anal warts and anal cancer.

    The anus was designed to hold in feces. The anus is surrounded with a ring-like muscle, called the anal sphincter, which tightens after we defecate. When the muscle is tight, anal penetration can be painful and difficult. Repetitive anal sex may lead to weakening of the anal sphincter, making it difficult to hold in feces until you can get to the toilet.

    ReplyDelete