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Friday, October 25, 2013

Lesbian Harassed And Then Shot by Jamaican Police

31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman
31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman and otherwise known as ‘Royal’ was shot by a Police Officer earlier today, October 25, 2013, around 10 a.m. after being bullied and physically attacked by an anti-gay man in Half Way Tree, Kingston.

According to the victim’s father Winston Tulloch, “Royal got into an altercation with a man who called her a ‘sadomite’ (anti-gay slur) and punched her in the face. She then proceeded to chase her attacker with a knife. The man ran to a police officer at the Texaco Gas station. While running towards the police officer and her attacker, the police officer shot her in her arm and she fell to the ground. The police then opened fire and shot her a second time in her chest.”

He further stated that, “the man who physically attacked her was pressured by the police officer to pursue criminal charges (Attempted Assault) against her.”

Royal is currently hospitalized in intensive care at the Kingston Public Hospital and was formally charged with attempted assault at 5:00 p.m. She is under police guard while being treated.

For the past three years Royal has been targeted and abused by police officers for her sexual identity, ‘a lesbian’ and her manly demeanor. In March 2011, at the Pavilion Mall in Half Way Tree, Kingston, she was brutally beaten by a few police officers. An anti-gay slur such as ‘Sadomite’ was hurled at her and she was mocked for appearing as a man before the attack began. It is believed that she sought help from the Jamaica Forum for Lesbian, All-Sexuals and Gay (J-FLAG) as well as reported all incidents of abuse and other attacks, however, no help was received from the local LGBT Advocacy organization, J-FLAG.

Recently on October 15, 2013, at 7:00 p.m, a large patrol of police officers beat and pepper sprayed a group of homeless gays as well as set their belongings on fire in New Kingston Jamaica.[1] Royal’s family is deeply worried that the police officer is going to kill her and put her away for a crime she didn’t commit.

Gays in Jamaica, or those suspected of being gay, are routinely victimized by all forms of ill-treatment and harassment by the police.[2] J-FLAG continues to report serious human rights abuses, including assault with deadly weapons, “corrective rape” of women accused of being lesbians, arbitrary detention, mob attacks, stabbings, setting on fire, harassment of LGBT patients by hospital and prison staff, and targeted shootings of such persons.[3]

The abuse, discrimination and shooting of lesbians living in Jamaica should not be tolerated by Jamaica’s security force.  We are urging the government of Jamaica to step in and free Keshema Tulloch, as well as charge the police officer for attempted murder. It is time for Portia Simpson-Miller to protect the lives of lesbians and gays. Enough is enough!


JUSTICE FOR KESHEMA TULLOCH


31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman

31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman

31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman



31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman

31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman

31-year-old Keshema Tulloch, an openly gay woman


























Citations:


[1] CVM TV News Watch (From 12:42-13:33) mins http://www.cvmtv.com/videos_1.php?id=2065&section=watch
[3] U.S.A Department of State. June 21, 2013. Travel Advisory to Jamaica: Special Concerns for LGBT Travelers http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1147.html




22 comments:

  1. With all due regard for human life, I sympathize with the victims of unnecessary abuse. However, the end of this story suggests that she be FREED and the police charged. Why should she be freed when she chased a man with a knife? Is there no regard for the law......she was still running toward the man and the police with a knife in hand. I don't understand the circumstances that led to the police shooting her TWICE?, and that should definitely be questioned. I've been called derogatory names many times before but I must observe the laws of my country. We should be fair and conduct balanced judgements: it is WRONG to attack these homosexual persons who are human beings like everyone else but like everyone else, homosexuals should know that it is also WRONG to disregard the law!

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    Replies
    1. Its called self defense the police should be charged accordingly. That's y jamaica will never be a better place

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    2. Must I say that I sympathize with the situation, however this isn't the full story, alot of things were distorted here esp the police's act in her "previous encounter". Secondly by law she gave her right away, she was armed enuh, and had had intention of using the weapon. The police man, saw someone running to him and another behind him with a knife, he wouldn't know that the guy had hit her, many would react the same, probably not shoot her a second time tho. But she would be charged, here or in any other country.

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    3. Dear writer,
      Your story is riddled with erroneous accounts and bias, doesn't make well for a good writer. I understand your aim, but truth must not be sacrificed just so you can achieve it. p.s. you said she 'sort' help, should be 'sought', dont think you're very credible or reliable. Good day to you sir.

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    4. Based on the information here, and the reports of many LGBT persons, experience teaches LGBT people to defend themselves instead of turning to the police. This highlights the importance of the law being upheld by all including the police and judiciary. If as a minority you have found no redress but instead you are hindered and harmed by the police, then it is logical (not necessarily right but logical) that you resort to taking responsibility for your safety. United and Strong in Saint Lucia held a successful human rights exercise for the police to be followed by judiciary and media. As much as we would like it to be different we have to acknowledge that the system has some serious flaws and that is what we need to attack.

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    5. Attention to legal nuances and perceived bias in the reporting is a vain attempt to detract from the prolonged history of harassment this young woman has endured, at the hands of people in the country who are supposed to be providing protection. Spelling errors in the story? Sounds like the primary concern of a douche bag or a seriously jaded person. I wonder what "truth" one would hope to gain from the other side; I doubt it or the real truth would be digestible. The real issues at hand... I hope she recovers from this in every way she's been affected

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    6. That's y jamaica will nva be a better place. Lowe ppl n da life style dem want to live. If dem choose 2 be gay,str8 r bi that's their buisness if ppl wan bleach that's their buisness. Y violence always have to be involved. N shoot 2 dis arm not to kill a wha do dem police dem. If it was dere daughter gay de would not want that done to them,,,!!!

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    7. This idiot here is checking spelling errors. Go back u fool, the report did say she sought for help and not sort like u claimed. Omg its right there. That nonsense im hearing here. The police attacking the gays and lesbians. If their daughter or sons were gay and bi would they try killing them. These policemen need to b taken out the force , for all i care they need to b dead cus police or not they gonna continue harassing them. Not fair at all, when they are not saints. I hope she comes out of this. Poor girl shot in self defense. Times like that i wish she had get him to stab his ass for real cus she is on a hospital bed now and up to now has not done anything.

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  2. Is it shoot 2 kill or shoot to maim

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  3. She favour Khago...ahahahaahahahahah

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  4. What this writer failed to do was to get the other side of the story....

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  5. Jamaicas anti human right are making the Jamaican people appear ignorant and foreboding. we need to fight for the rights off all citizens in Jamaica to be able to live freely on the island. Too often crimes of such nature and crimes against Denali on a whole are not taken seriously and the parties involve ate made mortars...these police as well as the criminals they swear to protect the people from are on in the same. We need to stop this.

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    Replies
    1. I agree we are not as ignorant n barbaric as they make us out be. Harsh truth is homosexuality is illegal here n until or if it is legal gay ppl need to keep their asses quiet. Sick of this in the news always. Even if i am/was gay I would keep a low profile until we r legal. And truth be told I have experience with these so called"butch". Dem need fi knw man ago see dem as threat as a next man. I disagree with him harassn her but some of them are quite cocky n hype.

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    2. Change has never come and will never come from people keeping a low profile. Look through the course of any countries history and you will see protests and demonstrations by the minority to enact change.
      All humans regardless of sexuality or gender have the right to freedom and respect. If she chooses to dress as she does it does not give someone the right to abuse her whether physically or verbally. And it is a foolish statement to say men will feel threatened by her dressing as a "man". She is not a man - so end of threat.
      Stand up and make a positive change with actions and your voice.

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  6. Jamaica is beautiful but the people often forget to model themselves from the beauty of the land..Crimes can't cease in Jamaica....right now Jamaica a small island I. the Caribbean tops the list nest to the middle east on crimes against woman and especially a woman who is not interested in men.... We need to sanction the Jamaican government till they get it....if Jamaica want to behave like the middle east...it should be treated as such...

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  7. Interesting to see some light brought on the situation of non-hetero-normative women. The writer did give J-Flag a slap there though. Have they addressed the incident at all?

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  8. Based on the information here, and the reports of many LGBT persons, experience teaches LGBT people to defend themselves instead of turning to the police. This highlights the importance of the law being upheld by all including the police and judiciary. If as a minority you have found no redress but instead you are hindered and harmed by the police, then it is logical (not necessarily right but logical) that you resort to taking responsibility for your safety. United and Strong in Saint Lucia held a successful human rights exercise for the police to be followed by judiciary and media. As much as we would like it to be different we have to acknowledge that the system has some serious flaws and that is what we need to attack.

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  9. I read every last comment here and ignorance is the society of JAMAICANS TODAY I am ABSOLUTELY ASHAMED to say I am Jamaican at times. I empathize with the family because I see what the system is made of POLITRICKS AND CORRUPTION. Why should she be charged and only her, both parties should be charged if even because every action brings a reaction. These people going around harassing people because of their sexuality YOU ALL HAVE VERYYYYYYYYYYY TINY MEDIOCRE MINDS, it shows that you have no respect for other persons. Why are you doing this because of your beliefs? If so then this world would be nothing like it is now. How dare you punch the young lady in her face I would of reacted the same way anyone would out of shock and fear of safety for your being. Each person has the right to choose the lifestyle they live as long as they are not affecting you or bringing it to you. Jamaicans are FOOLS when it comes to this topic and will always be. STOP HARASSING PEOPLE IN THEIR DAILY LIFE'S JUST BECAUSE YOU BELIEF IT'S WRONG. I WISH SOMEONE WILL RETURN THE SAME FAVOR TO THE MAN THAT INSTIGATED THE ATTACK AND ALSO TO THE OFFICER THAT SHOT THE YOUNG LADY. YOU BOTH ARE DISGUSTING AND NEED TO ATTAIN SOME KNOWLEDGE THAT'S WHAT YOUR LACKING!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  10. I heard this story from the horse's mouth. These situations makes it harder each day for the public to put their trust in those claimed to be set incharge of our lives!!! Lesbian, straight, gay or bi-sexuals have equal rights despite our sexual orientation. I am a plain witness to several verbal and physical abuse afflicted on Miss Tulloch and it is not and will not be put to rest as long as there is an ultimate creator.

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  11. I heard this story from the horse's mouth. These situations makes it harder each day for the public to put their trust in those claimed to be set incharge of our lives!!! Lesbian, straight, gay or bi-sexuals have equal rights despite our sexual orientation. I am a plain witness to several verbal and physical abuse afflicted on Miss Tulloch and it is not and will not be put to rest as long as there is an ultimate creator.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I heard this story from the horse's mouth. These situations makes it harder each day for the public to put their trust in those claimed to be set incharge of our lives!!! Lesbian, straight, gay or bi-sexuals have equal rights despite our sexual orientation. I am a plain witness to several verbal and physical abuse afflicted on Miss Tulloch and it is not and will not be put to rest as long as there is an ultimate creator.

    ReplyDelete